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Say the name “Meryl Streep”, and superlatives leap to mind.

“Success.” “Superstar.” “Icon.”

Would it surprise you to hear that that wasn’t always the case?

The November series, Bye-Bye Now, has focused on release. That sounds straightforward, but detaching from old habits and shifting restless, overcharged emotions into neutral can be tough. Yet we only open our lives to greater possibilities by taking the necessary steps.

This is what happened for Meryl Streep. She was working steadily in film and theatre when she got the call for the lead in “King Kong.” She knew how to audition. Nevertheless, her appointment quickly went south. This was her comment about the photo taken after the meeting:

meryl-streep-brutta

“This was me on my way home from an audition for King Kong where I was told I was too “ugly” for the part. This was a pivotal moment for me. This one rogue opinion could derail my dreams of becoming an actress, or force me to pull myself up by the bootstraps and believe in myself. I took a deep breath and said, “I’m sorry you think I’m too ugly for your film, but you’re just one opinion in a sea of thousands, and I’m off to find a kinder tide.”

An important part of being a Soul Boss is showing kindness, but that action shouldn’t be limited to others. The people we’ve met in this series decided that the best way to care for themselves was to let go and find a kinder tide:

  • In “I Just Couldn’t Say No,” Chris Botti liberated himself from conventional thinking. Taking a leap of faith to leave his jazz roots and work with Sting opened doors to the mainstream audience he had only dreamed about.
  • Meadow DeVor showed she was “Willing to Lose the Story” about her mountain of debt. Steadily correcting her financial past had an interesting side effect – it gave her wisdom that was priceless.
  • We saw how Louise Hay used spirituality as a distraction from her abusive past in “Enraged to Engaged”. Relief came after she admitted and worked through her longstanding anger.
  • Nia decided “Perfect is Overrated” and that her happiness didn’t have to wait until she had an amazing boss and the ideal work situation.

endless-possibilities

It’s time to say “bye-bye now” to something. You probably already know what it is.

The situation that doesn’t seem to get better, no matter how much time or energy you give. The person with the never-ending story about how you can’t do enough for them. Or the relationship that has simply run its course. It’s time to thank this experience for all it has provided…and then let it peacefully and permanently stay in 2016.

And if you feel nervous about the uncertainty that can come with releasing, use Meryl Streep’s happy ending as your motivation for what lies ahead. With a new year just around the corner, what do you want to hang on to?

Bitterness? Acrimony? Fear?

Or 19 Academy Award® nominations?